Ethiopian Airlines crash is second involving new Boeing 737 in 3months

The tragic deaths of 157 passengers and crew today, when an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft crashed within minutes of take-off in Addis Ababa, are raising serious questions over the safety record of both aircraft and airline.

It was on another brand new Boeing 737 Max 8, in Indonesia less than five months ago, that 189 people lost their lives in the Java Sea when Lion Air Flight 610 plummeted out of the skies minutes after taking off from Jakarta.

And the incident brings the African carrier’s death toll to 482 across 22 fatal incidents since its inception in 1965 – and almost 500 more people have been injured in EA crashes and incidents, according to information from the Flight Safety Foundation.

For comparison, only one British Airways flight has only ever been involved in one fatal incident: the Zagreb runway crash of 1976 when all 176 people aboard two planes died when BA Flight 476 collided with another aircraft on takeoff due to an air traffic control error.

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 went down within six minutes of take-off this morning (pictured: stock image)

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 went down within six minutes of take-off this morning (pictured: stock image)

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 went down within six minutes of take-off this morning (pictured: stock image)

Initial reports today show considerable similarities between the Ethiopian and Indonesian disasters which involve the same plane.

Today’s flight lost contact about six minutes after take-off, having requested and been given clearance to return to the airport in Abbis Ababa.

Last year, Lion Air 610 also went down minutes after take-off having requested permission to return to base.

Today, telemetry shows the plane’s vertical airspeed fluctuated rapidly in the minutes and second before its crash, including in the final moments when it seems to have been locked in a terrifyingly accelerating nosedive,.

Investigations thus far by the Indonesian and American aviation authorities have concluded the Lion Air plane also hit the sea after a violent nosedive.

Rescue team collect bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa

Rescue team collect bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa

Rescue team collect bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa

The wreckage of the plane - showing the colours of the Ethiopian flag on the plane's livery - lies at the scene of the crash

The wreckage of the plane - showing the colours of the Ethiopian flag on the plane's livery - lies at the scene of the crash

The wreckage of the plane – showing the colours of the Ethiopian flag on the plane’s livery – lies at the scene of the crash 

As in the case of October's Lion Air crash - also suffered by a Boeing 737 Max 8 - the plane seems to have suffered a rapid increase in vertical speed in the moments before its crash

As in the case of October's Lion Air crash - also suffered by a Boeing 737 Max 8 - the plane seems to have suffered a rapid increase in vertical speed in the moments before its crash

As in the case of October’s Lion Air crash – also suffered by a Boeing 737 Max 8 – the plane seems to have suffered a rapid increase in vertical speed in the moments before its crash

The New York Times reports today that investigators are considering whether that dive might have been caused by updated Boeing software that was meant to prevent a stall – but that can send the plane into a fatal descent if the altitude and angle information being fed into the computer system is incorrect.

The change in the flight control system, which can override manual motions in the Max model, was not explained to pilots, according to some pilots’ unions.

After that crash, Boeing said that it was continuing ‘to evaluate the need for software or other changes as we learn more from the ongoing investigation.’ It was unclear if the company had made any changes.

Today the Daily Telegraph reported that the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive in November last year in relation to one of the flight systems on the Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 series of aircraft.

That was published following the crash of Lion Air flight 610 on October 29.

The FAA directive warned that an ‘angle of attack’ censor, which is supposed to help to prevent a plane from stalling, could lead to an ‘excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss, and possible impact with the terrain’.

This ‘unsafe condition … is likely to exist or develop’ in the Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 designs, the directive concluded.

Boeing last night announced it will be sending a technical assistance team to the site of the crash.

When asked by the paper about the travel alert appearing to coincide with the crash, a US State Department official said: ‘On March 8, US Embassy Addis Ababa released an alert related to concerns about traffic in the city due to expected protests.

Due to those concerns, US government travellers were advised not to arrive or depart Bole International Airport. The restriction on travel to and from the airport was lifted on March 9.’

In a statement on Sunday, Boeing said it was ‘deeply saddened’ to learn of the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.

‘A Boeing technical team is prepared to provide technical assistance at the request and under the direction of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board,’ the company said.

Ethiopian Airlines hopes to become the most prominent airline on the continent. Pictured: A man looks at his phone outside the Ethiopian Airlines offices in downtown Nairobi, Kenya

Ethiopian Airlines hopes to become the most prominent airline on the continent. Pictured: A man looks at his phone outside the Ethiopian Airlines offices in downtown Nairobi, Kenya

Ethiopian Airlines hopes to become the most prominent airline on the continent. Pictured: A man looks at his phone outside the Ethiopian Airlines offices in downtown Nairobi, Kenya

The state-owned Ethiopian Airlines calls itself Africa’s largest carrier and has ambitions of becoming the gateway to the continent.

The airline does have a better safety rating and a newer fleet than some neighbouring operators – a number of African airlines are banned outright from EU airspace including the flag-carrier of neighbouring Eritrea.

But in addition to 16 fatal incidents costing 102 lives in the 1960s, 70s, and 1980s; the airline has now suffered six fatal incidents in the last thirty years, including other two huge tragedies.

In 1996 after a hijacking and a failed water landing, 125 people died on Flight 961 in Moroni, the capital of the Union of the Comoros in the Indian Ocean.

And in January 2010, 82 passengers and eight crew died when EA flight 409 from Beirut to Addis Ababa slammed into the Mediterranean shortly after take-off. 

The Lion Air aircraft crashed about 13 minutes after taking off for Indonesia. It is not clear how many people were on board (pictured is the plane)

The Lion Air aircraft crashed about 13 minutes after taking off for Indonesia. It is not clear how many people were on board (pictured is the plane)

The Lion Air aircraft crashed in October about 13 minutes after taking off for Indonesia

Human remains were placed in body bags after being recovered from the scene of the crash off Indonesia

Human remains were placed in body bags after being recovered from the scene of the crash off Indonesia

Human remains were placed in body bags after being recovered from the scene of the crash off Indonesia

Boeing’s 737 is the world’s most-sold passenger jet family and is considered one of the industry’s most reliable. 

The MAX 8 is the latest version of the aircraft, which Boeing rolled out in 2017 as an update to the already redesigned 50-year-old 737.

By the end of January, Boeing had delivered 350 MAX jets out of the total order tally of 5,011 aircraft.

 

Climber Tom Ballards girlfriend pleaded with him not to climb

Climber Tom Ballard’s girlfriend says she pleaded with him not to climb ‘Killer Mountain’ before he vanished and died on the Nanga Parbat peak

  • Stefania Pederiva repeatedly urged her boyfriend not to climb Nanga Parbat 
  • She said she felt ‘heartbreaking pain and strong anger’ that he didn’t listen  
  • ‘There are or will never be words suitable to describe the void you left’
  • Tom Ballard, 30, and climbing partner Daniele Nardi, 42, were confirmed dead on the weekend

Mail Foreign Service

The girlfriend of a British climber who died on a Himalayan peak known as the ‘Killer Mountain’ has revealed she begged him not to go.

Stefania Pederiva said she repeatedly urged Tom Ballard not to climb Nanga Parbat, in northern Pakistan, where his body was found over the weekend.

Miss Pederiva, who is Italian, said she felt ‘heartbreaking pain and strong anger’ over his decision to ignore her warnings.

Tom Ballard's girlfriend, Stefania Pederiva said she repeatedly urged Tom Ballard not to climb Nanga Parabat, in northern Pakistan, where his body was found over the weekend

Tom Ballard's girlfriend, Stefania Pederiva said she repeatedly urged Tom Ballard not to climb Nanga Parabat, in northern Pakistan, where his body was found over the weekend

Tom Ballard’s girlfriend, Stefania Pederiva said she repeatedly urged Tom Ballard not to climb Nanga Parabat, in northern Pakistan, where his body was found over the weekend 

The mountain (pictured above) which Tom and his friend Daniele had been scaling before they failed to make contact 

The mountain (pictured above) which Tom and his friend Daniele had been scaling before they failed to make contact 

The mountain (pictured above) which Tom and his friend Daniele had been scaling before they failed to make contact 

A map of the Nanga Parbat mountains in Pakistan (pictured above) which shows where Tom went missing and where his mother went missing in 1995

A map of the Nanga Parbat mountains in Pakistan (pictured above) which shows where Tom went missing and where his mother went missing in 1995

A map of the Nanga Parbat mountains in Pakistan (pictured above) which shows where Tom went missing and where his mother went missing in 1995

She added: ‘There are or will never be words suitable to describe the void you left.’

Officials confirmed on Saturday that both Mr Ballard, 30, and his Italian climbing partner Daniele Nardi, 42, had died – a fortnight after they vanished.

Mr Ballard was the son of Alison Hargreaves, who died aged 33 while descending nearby K2 in 1995.

Addressing her boyfriend in a post on Facebook, Miss Pederiva said: ‘Your dreams were not there, and that is why Mother Nature no longer protected you. I will find you in nature, in the rivers in the trees in the mountains, you will always be my most beautiful rock.’

She added that she felt ‘a heartbreaking pain and a strong anger for not listening to my constant words that told you that on that mountain you didn’t have to go’.

The Pakistani authorities last week dispatched a specialist team of four climbers – led by Spanish mountaineer Alex Txikon – to find the missing pair. They had last made contact on February 24.

On Wednesday the rescue team spotted two silhouettes at a height of about 19,400ft on Nanga Parbat, the world’s ninth-highest mountain. Mr Nardi had tried to climb it several times before.

Over the weekend officials confirmed the identities of the bodies. However, they were in a place that was difficult to reach, Italy’s ambassador to Pakistan said. Stefano Pontecorvo added that everything possible would be done to try to recover them. 

Advertisement

Ex-Army chief: Bloody Sunday charges may stop troops following orders

Soldiers will ‘think twice’ about obeying orders in future if veterans involved in Bloody Sunday are charged this week, a former Army chief has warned.

Lord Ramsbotham – who was military assistant to the chief of the general staff at the time of the shootings – said that prosecuting any of the 17 former soldiers under investigation would set a dangerous precedent.

Army veterans will find out on Thursday whether they face charges over the infamous shootings, in which 13 civilians died at the hands of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment on the streets of Londonderry in 1972.

British troops in Northern Ireland during the Troubles which began in the late 1960s and lasted until 1998 with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement

British troops in Northern Ireland during the Troubles which began in the late 1960s and lasted until 1998 with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement

British troops in Northern Ireland during the Troubles which began in the late 1960s and lasted until 1998 with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement

Former military chief Lord Ramsbotham who has said that prosecuting British soldiers over the deaths of civilians on Bloody Sunday would set a dangerous precedent for the Army's future operations around the world

Former military chief Lord Ramsbotham who has said that prosecuting British soldiers over the deaths of civilians on Bloody Sunday would set a dangerous precedent for the Army's future operations around the world

Former military chief Lord Ramsbotham who has said that prosecuting British soldiers over the deaths of civilians on Bloody Sunday would set a dangerous precedent for the Army’s future operations around the world

Two former Official IRA suspects are also facing charges.

Soldiers had claimed they retaliated after coming under gunfire. However in 2010, a £200million report compiled by Lord Saville concluded that the civilians killed in one of the darkest periods of the Troubles were innocent.

The prospect of charges against men now in their 60s and 70s, almost 50 years on, has caused ‘profound concern’ within the Army, according to crossbench peer Lord Ramsbotham.

Lying on the ground is a man receiving attention, during the shooting incident in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, which became known as Bloody Sunday on January 30, 1972

Lying on the ground is a man receiving attention, during the shooting incident in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, which became known as Bloody Sunday on January 30, 1972

Lying on the ground is a man receiving attention, during the shooting incident in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, which became known as Bloody Sunday on January 30, 1972

‘The position of a commander giving an order to somebody to open fire, if it’s likely to end up in court, the soldier receiving the order and the person giving the order will think twice about it in the future,’ he said. ‘That could have very serious implications if we’re defending this country. I am thinking in terms of the command and control of the Army as a whole.’

Lord Ramsbotham reached the rank of adjutant-general in the Army, one of its most senior positions, before leaving in 1993. He later served as chief inspector of prisons for England and Wales.

As Lieutenant Colonel David Ramsbotham, he was in London when he heard that people had been killed on a civil rights march.

High velocity bullets fired by the British Army on Bloody Sunday are on display at The Museum of Free Derry in Derry City's Bogside, Northern Ireland. 13 people died from shots fired by the British Army during the conflict, and another individual died later from injuries

High velocity bullets fired by the British Army on Bloody Sunday are on display at The Museum of Free Derry in Derry City's Bogside, Northern Ireland. 13 people died from shots fired by the British Army during the conflict, and another individual died later from injuries

High velocity bullets fired by the British Army on Bloody Sunday are on display at The Museum of Free Derry in Derry City’s Bogside, Northern Ireland. 13 people died from shots fired by the British Army during the conflict, and another individual died later from injuries

He said he was ‘very sorry… soldiers might have been involved in killing people on the streets of Londonderry’, adding that then-head of the Army Sir Michael Carver was ‘appalled’.

The 84-year-old added that if charges are brought on Thursday, the Government should ensure veterans are ‘supported’ and ‘given the legal help they require’.

‘I’m involved in the general hope that a line could be drawn and we could stop the idea of prosecuting people for something that happened in the 1970s,’ he said.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson admitted last week that plans to introduce a ten-year limit on soldier prosecutions would come into effect in time for the Bloody Sunday soldiers

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson admitted last week that plans to introduce a ten-year limit on soldier prosecutions would come into effect in time for the Bloody Sunday soldiers

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson admitted last week that plans to introduce a ten-year limit on soldier prosecutions would come into effect in time for the Bloody Sunday soldiers

Last week, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson admitted that plans to introduce a ten-year limit on soldier prosecutions will ‘sadly, not come in time’ for Bloody Sunday veterans. Claims that charges could impact future military operations have been echoed by Democratic Unionist MPs.

However members of Sinn Fein, the Ulster Unionist Party and the Social Democratic and Labour Party, have backed prosecutions for soldiers if there is evidence that they broke the law. It comes as the families of those killed during Bloody Sunday restated their calls for prosecutions.

Kate Nash, 70, whose 19-year-old brother William was shot dead and her father injured, said: ‘We have fought for this [prosecutions] for all these years. We don’t care that these are old men.

‘My brother was a young man. He was 19. He lost his life. He didn’t get a chance to get to be an old man. My brother was murdered and the men responsible for that should be prosecuted.’

Taxi driver Mickey McKinney, 67, lost his brother William, 27, a keen amateur filmmaker who worked as a typesetter.

He said: ‘It’s right that justice must be seen to be done. They told a lie and said my brother and everybody else killed were gunmen and nail bombers. These men have to pay for what they did. The time since the incident is no excuse at all. They have not shown one ounce of remorse.’

The Saville report concluded that Mr Nash did not pose a threat and Mr McKinney was not in possession of a bomb or firearm.

John McKinney, whose brother William was killed on Bloody Sunday, stands beside the Civil Rights mural in Derry City's Bogside. Army veterans will find out on Thursday whether they face charges over the infamous shootings

John McKinney, whose brother William was killed on Bloody Sunday, stands beside the Civil Rights mural in Derry City's Bogside. Army veterans will find out on Thursday whether they face charges over the infamous shootings

John McKinney, whose brother William was killed on Bloody Sunday, stands beside the Civil Rights mural in Derry City’s Bogside. Army veterans will find out on Thursday whether they face charges over the infamous shootings

Oxford museum comes under pressure to remove shrunken heads

Oxford museum comes under pressure to remove shrunken heads after complaints from indigenous South American tribes

  • Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford has received complaints from the Shuar people 
  • The shrunken heads have been on display at the musuem since the 1940s 
  • The museum has also received complaints for putting human remains on show 

Charlie Bayliss For Mailonline

A museum collection of shrunken human heads could be removed from display after complaints from a group of indigenous South Americans.

The Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford has been contacted by the Shuar people in the Amazon rainforest about the shrunken heads, which they say are of religious importance.

Museum curators said the talks came about after they were labelled a ‘freak show’ by a visitor.

The shrunken heads on display at Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford may be taken off display

The shrunken heads on display at Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford may be taken off display

The shrunken heads still have a hair on them

The shrunken heads still have a hair on them

The shrunken heads on display at Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford may be taken off display

It is hoped that a deal can be struck with the Shaur which would allow them to continue to the show the heads, which have been on display since the 1940s, by emphasising their cultural significance.  

The museum has already been forced to remove two scalps from display after complaints by Native American communities who claimed their culture has been misrepresented.

Laura Van Broekhoven, the director of the Pitt Rivers Museum, told The Telegraph: ‘We know the collection of heads is cherished by many, but there are also many people who feel uncomfortable with it. There are questions about whether human remains should be on display.’

She added: ‘Their concerns are whether there is a proper understanding of the way this elaborate leather-making of human skin into a ceremonial object was done, and that it no longer is done today.’

The museum has already been forced to remove two scalps from display after complaints by Native American communities who claimed their culture has been misrepresented

The museum has already been forced to remove two scalps from display after complaints by Native American communities who claimed their culture has been misrepresented

The museum has already been forced to remove two scalps from display after complaints by Native American communities who claimed their culture has been misrepresented

One way which the display material might stay up is by explaining the part the heads played in the spiritual life of the Shuar and Achuar people, Ms Van Broekhoven said

One way which the display material might stay up is by explaining the part the heads played in the spiritual life of the Shuar and Achuar people, Ms Van Broekhoven said

One way which the display material might stay up is by explaining the part the heads played in the spiritual life of the Shuar and Achuar people, Ms Van Broekhoven said

One way which the display material might stay up is by explaining the part the heads played in the spiritual life of the Shuar and Achuar people, Ms Van Broekhoven said.

She said: ‘The display may not be communicating properly the importance of the shrunken heads. It may be a case of adding a message or a display in the case to help people understand more about what they are looking at.’ 

The Shuar and Achuar people of Ecuador and Peru made the shrunken heads as they believed it would harnass the spirit of the enemy and prevent the soul from avenging his death.   

Ms Van Broekhoven said ‘all options are on the table’, adding: ‘There will be consultation with the Shuar, but for now the display will stay as it is.’

Museum curators said the talks came about after they were labelled a 'freak show' by a visitor

Museum curators said the talks came about after they were labelled a 'freak show' by a visitor

Museum curators said the talks came about after they were labelled a ‘freak show’ by a visitor

Advertisement

Lucky pedestrian strolls past building just seconds before collapse

Time to buy a lottery ticket! Lucky pedestrian strolls past building just seconds before massive collapse which would have crushed him

  • CCTV footage shows a man wandering down street in Hackney, east London
  • A mass of bricks and rubble fall to the ground moments after he walks past
  • London Fire Brigade said no one was hurt as high winds caused chaos across UK

Sophie Law For Mailonline

A lucky pedestrian narrowly avoids being crushed by falling bricks as he strolls past a collapsing building in shocking footage.

The clip, filmed on CCTV, shows a man wandering along the busy pavement on Stoke Newington High Street in Hackney, east London on Sunday.   

But just seconds after he walks past a cafe, a mass of bricks and rubble crash to the ground in a cloud of dust. 

The fortunate pedestrian narrowly misses being crushed by the collapsing building which was ripped apart by high winds. 

London Fire Brigade said no one was hurt but the clean up of the rubble took almost two hours, the BBC reports.

Pictures show a huge pile of fallen bricks and debris littering the street as fire crew tackle the mess.

The road had to be closed between between Kingsland High Street at junction with Dalston Lane as the building was deemed unsafe.  

Pictures shows the mass of fallen bricks and debris littering the street as fire officers tackled the mess

Pictures shows the mass of fallen bricks and debris littering the street as fire officers tackled the mess

Pictures shows the mass of fallen bricks and debris littering the street as fire officers tackled the mess

It comes as high winds wreaked havoc across Britain as roofs and roads were closed due to damage from extreme weather.

In London two women had a narrow escape when a scaffolding tower collapsed. 

Nicole Brown, 24, and Layla Galvin, 34, avoided death by ‘seconds’ when the structure came down in the Kensington street where Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood lives. 

The roof above Stokey Vintage Cafe on Stoke Newington High Street collapsed this morning due to high winds

The roof above Stokey Vintage Cafe on Stoke Newington High Street collapsed this morning due to high winds

The roof above Stokey Vintage Cafe on Stoke Newington High Street collapsed this morning due to high winds

The roof above Stokey Vintage Cafe on Stoke Newington High Street collapsed this morning due to high winds

The roof above Stokey Vintage Cafe on Stoke Newington High Street collapsed this morning due to high winds

Advertisement

Venezuelans turn to looting in Caracas during power outages

Some Venezuelans have taken to looting supermarkets in Caracas during the fourth day of blackouts, which have paralysed the country. 

Pictures reveal that some supermarkets in the capital have been left ransacked by desperate residents as they struggle to find food. 

Security forces detained a number of people who were caught looting on Sunday, with some pictures showing looters being piled onto waiting trucks. 

Armed men were seen forcefully escorting young men and women to the trucks. 

Some Venezuelans have taken to looting supermarkets in Caracas during the fourth day of blackouts that have paralysed the country

Some Venezuelans have taken to looting supermarkets in Caracas during the fourth day of blackouts that have paralysed the country

Some Venezuelans have taken to looting supermarkets in Caracas during the fourth day of blackouts that have paralysed the country

Supermarkets were left ransacked by hungry looters, desperate to find food during the ongoing food shortages in Venezuela

Supermarkets were left ransacked by hungry looters, desperate to find food during the ongoing food shortages in Venezuela

Supermarkets were left ransacked by hungry looters, desperate to find food during the ongoing food shortages in Venezuela

This man was detained by security forces after being caught looting in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas on Sunday

This man was detained by security forces after being caught looting in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas on Sunday

This man was detained by security forces after being caught looting in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas on Sunday 

Desperate Venezuelan looters with supplies they have taken from a Caracas supermarket. They were detained by security forces

Desperate Venezuelan looters with supplies they have taken from a Caracas supermarket. They were detained by security forces

Desperate Venezuelan looters with supplies they have taken from a Caracas supermarket. They were detained by security forces 

The country will enter its fifth consecutive day of power outages on Monday, which have also forced people to rummage through bins for food, queue to charge electronic devices using a solar panel and buy bread with 100-dollar bills after the country was hit by a fourth day of blackouts. 

Opposition leader Juan Guaido called for a nation-wide march on Caracas to crank up the pressure on embattled President Nicolas Maduro, as the country endured its third night largely without power.

The massive blackout, crippling the oil-rich but economically troubled South American nation, has fuelled the political standoff between Guaido, who is recognised as Venezuela’s leader by more than 50 countries, and Maduro, who is clinging to power.

No national data was available about the impact of the power outage, but an NGO said at least 15 patients with advanced kidney disease died after they stopped receiving dialysis treatments in darkened hospitals. 

Armed Venezuelan forces escort a woman to waiting trucks that were set up to detain looters in the capital of Caracas

Armed Venezuelan forces escort a woman to waiting trucks that were set up to detain looters in the capital of Caracas

Armed Venezuelan forces escort a woman to waiting trucks that were set up to detain looters in the capital of Caracas

Looters are faced lying down on their stomachs and patrolled armed forces after ransacking a Caracas supermarket on Sunday

Looters are faced lying down on their stomachs and patrolled armed forces after ransacking a Caracas supermarket on Sunday

Looters are faced lying down on their stomachs and patrolled armed forces after ransacking a Caracas supermarket on Sunday

Looters are piled onto waiting trucks by armed security forces in Caracas. The looting happened during the fourth day of power outages

Looters are piled onto waiting trucks by armed security forces in Caracas. The looting happened during the fourth day of power outages

Looters are piled onto waiting trucks by armed security forces in Caracas. The looting happened during the fourth day of power outages

Parts of Venezuela are still affected by black outs that began on Thursday. Outages affected 70 per cent of the country at first. President Nicolas Maduro blamed the outages on a 'imperialist' attack

Parts of Venezuela are still affected by black outs that began on Thursday. Outages affected 70 per cent of the country at first. President Nicolas Maduro blamed the outages on a 'imperialist' attack

Parts of Venezuela are still affected by black outs that began on Thursday. Outages affected 70 per cent of the country at first. President Nicolas Maduro blamed the outages on a ‘imperialist’ attack

As of Sunday, businesses remained shut, hospitals struggled to operate, and public transport barely functioned.

The 35-year-old Guaido, the head of Venezuela’s National Assembly, earlier told thousands of supporters that he would soon embark on a nation-wide listening tour before leading a march on the capital. 

National Assembly leader Juan Guaido said he will ask the Venezuelan legislature to declare a ‘state of alarm’ in order to request international aid amid the massive power outage.

Guaido, who declared himself acting president in January, said he has convened an emergency session of the National Assembly on Monday ‘to take immediate actions with respect to the necessary humanitarian aid’. 

Residents of Caracas queue up as others charge their phones using a solar panel at a public square. The city, along with much of Venezuela has faced three days of rolling blackouts and power outages

Residents of Caracas queue up as others charge their phones using a solar panel at a public square. The city, along with much of Venezuela has faced three days of rolling blackouts and power outages

Residents of Caracas queue up as others charge their phones using a solar panel at a public square. The city, along with much of Venezuela has faced three days of rolling blackouts and power outages 

A cashier counts US dollar bills and Venezuelan bolivar notes received from a customer in a bakery during the blackouts

A cashier counts US dollar bills and Venezuelan bolivar notes received from a customer in a bakery during the blackouts

A cashier counts US dollar bills and Venezuelan bolivar notes received from a customer in a bakery during the blackouts 

A supporter of Juan Guaido standing in front of a line of National Bolivarian riot police officers with her hands in the air

A supporter of Juan Guaido standing in front of a line of National Bolivarian riot police officers with her hands in the air

A supporter of Juan Guaido standing in front of a line of National Bolivarian riot police officers with her hands in the air

The massive blackout, crippling the oil-rich but economically troubled South American nation, has fuelled the political standoff between Guaido, who is recognised as Venezuela's leader by more than 50 countries, and Maduro, who is clinging to power

The massive blackout, crippling the oil-rich but economically troubled South American nation, has fuelled the political standoff between Guaido, who is recognised as Venezuela's leader by more than 50 countries, and Maduro, who is clinging to power

The massive blackout, crippling the oil-rich but economically troubled South American nation, has fuelled the political standoff between Guaido, who is recognised as Venezuela’s leader by more than 50 countries, and Maduro, who is clinging to power

Caracas last night during the third night of blackouts across Venezuela as the country reeled from a series of power cuts. Opposition leader Juan Guaido called for a nation-wide march on the capital

Caracas last night during the third night of blackouts across Venezuela as the country reeled from a series of power cuts. Opposition leader Juan Guaido called for a nation-wide march on the capital

Caracas last night during the third night of blackouts across Venezuela as the country reeled from a series of power cuts. Opposition leader Juan Guaido called for a nation-wide march on the capital 

A street during a blackout in Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela, during the third night of blackouts across the country. An NGO said at least 15 kidney patients died after their dialysis stopped working

A street during a blackout in Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela, during the third night of blackouts across the country. An NGO said at least 15 kidney patients died after their dialysis stopped working

A street during a blackout in Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela, during the third night of blackouts across the country. An NGO said at least 15 kidney patients died after their dialysis stopped working

The blackouts have caused even more friction between the opposition leader and self-declared Venezuelan president - Juan Guaido - and the official president - Nicolas Maduro

The blackouts have caused even more friction between the opposition leader and self-declared Venezuelan president - Juan Guaido - and the official president - Nicolas Maduro

The blackouts have caused even more friction between the opposition leader and self-declared Venezuelan president – Juan Guaido – and the official president – Nicolas Maduro

Guaido, who declared himself acting president in January, said he has convened an emergency session of the National Assembly on Monday 'to take immediate actions with respect to the necessary humanitarian aid'

Guaido, who declared himself acting president in January, said he has convened an emergency session of the National Assembly on Monday 'to take immediate actions with respect to the necessary humanitarian aid'

Guaido, who declared himself acting president in January, said he has convened an emergency session of the National Assembly on Monday ‘to take immediate actions with respect to the necessary humanitarian aid’

A family resting outside their house using candles to light their home during a blackout in Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela, as power outages swept the country

A family resting outside their house using candles to light their home during a blackout in Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela, as power outages swept the country

A family resting outside their house using candles to light their home during a blackout in Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela, as power outages swept the country 

Supporters of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro are seen in a street of Caracas as they prepare to disperse opposition demonstrators and to lift barricades

Supporters of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro are seen in a street of Caracas as they prepare to disperse opposition demonstrators and to lift barricades

Supporters of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro are seen in a street of Caracas as they prepare to disperse opposition demonstrators and to lift barricades

Activists had scuffled with police and troops ahead of the rally, meant to pressure Maduro amid the blackout, which the governing Socialist Party called an act of US-sponsored sabotage but opposition critics derided as the result of two decades of mismanagement and corruption

Activists had scuffled with police and troops ahead of the rally, meant to pressure Maduro amid the blackout, which the governing Socialist Party called an act of US-sponsored sabotage but opposition critics derided as the result of two decades of mismanagement and corruption

Activists had scuffled with police and troops ahead of the rally, meant to pressure Maduro amid the blackout, which the governing Socialist Party called an act of US-sponsored sabotage but opposition critics derided as the result of two decades of mismanagement and corruption

President Nicolas Maduro has so far rejected international aid, using his security forces to repel an opposition bid last month to bring in aid through neighbouring countries Colombia and Brazil

President Nicolas Maduro has so far rejected international aid, using his security forces to repel an opposition bid last month to bring in aid through neighbouring countries Colombia and Brazil

President Nicolas Maduro has so far rejected international aid, using his security forces to repel an opposition bid last month to bring in aid through neighbouring countries Colombia and Brazil

A police officer during an opposition rally in Victoria Avenue, Caracas, yesterday. Opposition leader, Juan Guaido, called for a nation-wide march on Caracas today as the blackout continued

A police officer during an opposition rally in Victoria Avenue, Caracas, yesterday. Opposition leader, Juan Guaido, called for a nation-wide march on Caracas today as the blackout continued

A police officer during an opposition rally in Victoria Avenue, Caracas, yesterday. Opposition leader, Juan Guaido, called for a nation-wide march on Caracas today as the blackout continued 

‘We must attend to this catastrophe immediately. We cannot turn away from it,’ said Guaido.

President Nicolas Maduro has so far rejected international aid, using his security forces to repel an opposition bid last month to bring in aid through neighbouring countries Colombia and Brazil.

Maduro has claimed that the power outage at the country’s Guri hydroelectric complex, the source of 80 percent of the country’s power, was caused by a cyberattack.

Addressing supporters in southwestern Caracas, Guaido – the leader of the opposition-run congress who invoked the constitution to assume an interim presidency in January – said Maduro’s government ‘has no way to solve the electricity crisis that they themselves created’. 

‘Once we’ve finished the tour, the organisation in every state, we’ll announce the date when all together, we’ll come to Caracas,’ Guaido said, a megaphone in his hand as he stood on the roof of a pickup truck. 

‘All of Venezuela, to Caracas’, Guaido yelled while standing atop a bridge, without saying when the planned protest would be held. ‘The days ahead will be difficult, thanks to the regime.’ 

Activists had scuffled with police and troops ahead of the rally, meant to pressure Maduro amid the blackout, which the governing Socialist Party called an act of U.S.-sponsored sabotage but opposition critics derided as the result of two decades of mismanagement and corruption. 

Security forces had prevented the opposition from setting up a stage at their original protest site, arresting three people.

Dozens of demonstrators attempted to walk along an avenue in Caracas but were moved onto the sidewalk by police in riot gear, leading them to shout at the officers and push on their riot shields. One woman was sprayed with pepper spray, according to a local broadcaster.

The power flickered on and off in parts of Caracas on Saturday morning, including the presidential palace of Miraflores.

Guaido said Maduro's government 'has no way to solve the electricity crisis that they themselves created'

Guaido said Maduro's government 'has no way to solve the electricity crisis that they themselves created'

Guaido said Maduro’s government ‘has no way to solve the electricity crisis that they themselves created’

Residents in Caracas use their mobile phones at the Francisco Fajardo highway - where they can get telephone service- during a partial power outage

Residents in Caracas use their mobile phones at the Francisco Fajardo highway - where they can get telephone service- during a partial power outage

Residents in Caracas use their mobile phones at the Francisco Fajardo highway – where they can get telephone service- during a partial power outage

Hundreds took to the streets of Caracas as businesses remained shut, hospitals struggled to operate, and public transport barely functioned during the blackouts

Hundreds took to the streets of Caracas as businesses remained shut, hospitals struggled to operate, and public transport barely functioned during the blackouts

Hundreds took to the streets of Caracas as businesses remained shut, hospitals struggled to operate, and public transport barely functioned during the blackouts 

It is one of the worst and longest blackouts in recent memory in Venezuela, which is already suffering from shortages of food and medicine due to the overarching economic crisis

It is one of the worst and longest blackouts in recent memory in Venezuela, which is already suffering from shortages of food and medicine due to the overarching economic crisis

It is one of the worst and longest blackouts in recent memory in Venezuela, which is already suffering from shortages of food and medicine due to the overarching economic crisis

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido (right with a megaphone) speaking during a demo in Caracas

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido (right with a megaphone) speaking during a demo in Caracas

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido (right with a megaphone) speaking during a demo in Caracas

Supporters of the head of the Venezuelan Parliament, Juan Guaido, demonstrating in Caracas yesterday. One man can be seen carrying a gas mask through the street

Supporters of the head of the Venezuelan Parliament, Juan Guaido, demonstrating in Caracas yesterday. One man can be seen carrying a gas mask through the street

Supporters of the head of the Venezuelan Parliament, Juan Guaido, demonstrating in Caracas yesterday. One man can be seen carrying a gas mask through the street

A supporter of the Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido, shouting to National Bolivarian Police officers during a demo in Caracas

A supporter of the Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido, shouting to National Bolivarian Police officers during a demo in Caracas

A supporter of the Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido, shouting to National Bolivarian Police officers during a demo in Caracas

An aerial view of the city during the ongoing blackout in Caracas. Six of the country's 23 states are still without power as many residents have taken to the streets

An aerial view of the city during the ongoing blackout in Caracas. Six of the country's 23 states are still without power as many residents have taken to the streets

An aerial view of the city during the ongoing blackout in Caracas. Six of the country’s 23 states are still without power as many residents have taken to the streets

Six of the country’s 23 states still lacked power as of Saturday afternoon, Socialist Party Vice President Diosdado Cabello said on state television.

‘Miraflores, Miraflores!’ chanted Guaido’s supporters in response – a reference to the presidential palace currently occupied by Maduro.

Guaido, who proclaimed himself president of the country of 30 million people in January and says Maduro’s May re-election was illegitimate – wants to set up new polls.

He threatened to authorise an outside military intervention ‘when the time comes,’ pointing to the constitution, which authorises ‘the use of a Venezuelan military mission abroad, or foreigners inside the country.’

‘All the options are on the table,’ he said, borrowing a phrase from US President Donald Trump. 

Maduro also rallied his supporters. Wearing red, they protested against ‘imperialism’ at a march that marked four years since the United States branded Venezuela a ‘threat’ to its security and imposed sanctions.

‘Today, more than ever, we’re anti-imperialists. We will never surrender!’ Maduro wrote on Twitter.

He said almost 70 percent of power had been restored by mid-day, when a ‘cyber attack’ was reported at a major power plant.

‘That disturbed and undid everything we had achieved,’ he said.

Both the pro-Guaido and the pro-Maduro rallies ended without major incident. 

It is one of the worst and longest blackouts in recent memory in Venezuela, which is already suffering from shortages of food and medicine due to the overarching economic crisis. 

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido spoke during a demo in Caracas and called for more pressure to be put on President Maduro

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido spoke during a demo in Caracas and called for more pressure to be put on President Maduro

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido spoke during a demo in Caracas and called for more pressure to be put on President Maduro 

Protesters during an opposition rally in Caracas on Saturday. More demonstrations are expected today to put more pressure on President Nicolas Maduro

Protesters during an opposition rally in Caracas on Saturday. More demonstrations are expected today to put more pressure on President Nicolas Maduro

Protesters during an opposition rally in Caracas on Saturday. More demonstrations are expected today to put more pressure on President Nicolas Maduro

Police officers during an opposition rally in Caracas as protesters took to the streets over the rolling blackouts hitting much of the oil-rich country

Police officers during an opposition rally in Caracas as protesters took to the streets over the rolling blackouts hitting much of the oil-rich country

Police officers during an opposition rally in Caracas as protesters took to the streets over the rolling blackouts hitting much of the oil-rich country 

Riot police forming a line in front of protesters in Caracas yesterday as demonstration are expected to continue in the capital as the power outages remain

Riot police forming a line in front of protesters in Caracas yesterday as demonstration are expected to continue in the capital as the power outages remain

Riot police forming a line in front of protesters in Caracas yesterday as demonstration are expected to continue in the capital as the power outages remain 

The power flickered on and off in parts of Caracas on Saturday morning, including the presidential palace of Miraflores

The power flickered on and off in parts of Caracas on Saturday morning, including the presidential palace of Miraflores

The power flickered on and off in parts of Caracas on Saturday morning, including the presidential palace of Miraflores

Venezuelan National Guard officers were deployed on the streets of the capital to quell the rising tide of demonstrations

Venezuelan National Guard officers were deployed on the streets of the capital to quell the rising tide of demonstrations

Venezuelan National Guard officers were deployed on the streets of the capital to quell the rising tide of demonstrations 

Rossmary Nascimiento, 45, a nutritionist at the Caracas rally said: ‘We’re all upset that we’ve got no power, no phone service, no water and they want to block us. I want a normal country.’

Julio Castro, a doctor and member of a nongovernmental organisation called Doctors For Health, tweeted that a total of 17 people had died during the blackout, including nine deaths in emergency rooms.

But the deaths could not independently confirmed or even whether they could have resulted from the blackout. The Information Ministry did not respond to a request for comment.

Clinics in the sweltering western state of Zulia, which suffers chronic regional blackouts, had scaled back operations after nearly 72 hours without power.

‘We’re not offering services and we don’t have any patients staying here because the generator is not working,’ said Chiquinquira Caldera, head of administration at the San Lucas clinic in the city of Maracaibo, as she played a game of Chinese checkers with doctors who were waiting for power to return.

At a competing march organised by the Socialist Party to protest what it calls U.S. imperialism, Maduro blamed the outages on ‘electromagnetic and cyber attacks directed from abroad by the empire.’

‘The right wing, together with the empire, has stabbed the electricity system, and we are trying to cure it soon,’ he said. 

Venezuelan Yadira Delgado and her daughter Vanesa play with their cat at their home in Caracas on Sunday during a massive power outage

Venezuelan Yadira Delgado and her daughter Vanesa play with their cat at their home in Caracas on Sunday during a massive power outage

Venezuelan Yadira Delgado and her daughter Vanesa play with their cat at their home in Caracas on Sunday during a massive power outage

People use their mobile phones at the Francisco Fajardo highway in one of the few areas they can get phone service during the power outage

People use their mobile phones at the Francisco Fajardo highway in one of the few areas they can get phone service during the power outage

People use their mobile phones at the Francisco Fajardo highway in one of the few areas they can get phone service during the power outage

View of the state-owned telephone and internet company CANTV headquarters in Caracas. Venezuela has suffered rolling blackout for three days, which the regime has blamed of cyber attacks

View of the state-owned telephone and internet company CANTV headquarters in Caracas. Venezuela has suffered rolling blackout for three days, which the regime has blamed of cyber attacks

View of the state-owned telephone and internet company CANTV headquarters in Caracas. Venezuela has suffered rolling blackout for three days, which the regime has blamed of cyber attacks 

Venezuelan riot police block a demo of supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido in Caracas

Venezuelan riot police block a demo of supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido in Caracas

Venezuelan riot police block a demo of supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido in Caracas

At a competing march organised by the Socialist Party to protest what it calls U.S. imperialism, Maduro blamed the outages on cyber attacks and sabotage

At a competing march organised by the Socialist Party to protest what it calls U.S. imperialism, Maduro blamed the outages on cyber attacks and sabotage

At a competing march organised by the Socialist Party to protest what it calls U.S. imperialism, Maduro blamed the outages on cyber attacks and sabotage 

People by institutions and shops closed due to power outage and many other queued by busses and hospitals during the outage

People by institutions and shops closed due to power outage and many other queued by busses and hospitals during the outage

People by institutions and shops closed due to power outage and many other queued by busses and hospitals during the outage

Several hundred people gathered at the rally in central Caracas for a march to denounce the crippling U.S. oil sanctions aimed at cutting off the Maduro government’s funding sources.

‘We’re here, we’re mobilised, because we’re not going to let the gringos take over,’ said Elbadina Gomez, 76, who works for an activist group linked to the Socialist Party.

Problems have been exacerbated by hyperinflation that the International Monetary Fund says will reach 10 million percent this year. 

An estimated 2.7 million people have left the country since 2015.

‘I’ve spent three nights in a lot of distress. I’m very anxious because the situation is not getting resolved, the little food that we have in the fridge is going to spoil,’ said Francisca Rojas, a 62-year-old retiree living in Caracas.

‘How long are we going to put up with this?’ 

Communications Minister Jorge Rodriguez blamed the initial power outage on a cyber attack against the Guri hydroelectric plant in the country’s south, which serves 80 percent of Venezuela.

Critics blame the government for failing to invest in maintaining the power grid.

A doctor and member of a nongovernmental organisation called Doctors For Health, tweeted that a total of 17 people had died during the blackout, including nine deaths in emergency rooms

A doctor and member of a nongovernmental organisation called Doctors For Health, tweeted that a total of 17 people had died during the blackout, including nine deaths in emergency rooms

A doctor and member of a nongovernmental organisation called Doctors For Health, tweeted that a total of 17 people had died during the blackout, including nine deaths in emergency rooms

People by a fuel filling station yesterday. Several hundred people gathered at a rally in Caracas for a march to denounce the crippling U.S. oil sanctions aimed at cutting off the Maduro government's funding sources

People by a fuel filling station yesterday. Several hundred people gathered at a rally in Caracas for a march to denounce the crippling U.S. oil sanctions aimed at cutting off the Maduro government's funding sources

People by a fuel filling station yesterday. Several hundred people gathered at a rally in Caracas for a march to denounce the crippling U.S. oil sanctions aimed at cutting off the Maduro government’s funding sources

A pair with containers for drinking water as many in the country are forced to scavenge for food and water as US sanctions and hyperinflation ravage Venezuela

A pair with containers for drinking water as many in the country are forced to scavenge for food and water as US sanctions and hyperinflation ravage Venezuela

A pair with containers for drinking water as many in the country are forced to scavenge for food and water as US sanctions and hyperinflation ravage Venezuela

People going through rubbing to find food. Caracas and most Venezuelan states were left without power supply and its residents have resorted to desperate measures

People going through rubbing to find food. Caracas and most Venezuelan states were left without power supply and its residents have resorted to desperate measures

People going through rubbing to find food. Caracas and most Venezuelan states were left without power supply and its residents have resorted to desperate measures 

Hospitals have since reported terrible problems, and those with generators were using them only in emergencies, while flights were cancelled, leaving hundreds of travelers stranded at airports.

The Caracas subway, which transports two million people a day, remained shuttered.

Francisco Valencia, director of the Codevida health rights group that reported the 15 deaths, said some 10,200 people were at risk because dialysis units had switched off.

‘We are talking about 95 percent of dialysis units, which today likely hit 100 percent, being paralysed, due to the power outage,’ he said.

Late Saturday, entire families parked their cars along the main highway in Caracas in the hopes of capturing faint cell phone service to check on loved ones and get the latest news.

‘My son and my brother live outside Venezuela, and they want to hear from us,’ said Bernadette Ramirez, who came with some neighbours to the highway.

US President Donald Trump’s national security advisor said Sunday that members of Venezuela’s military have been in conversation with National Assembly members about how they might move to support the opposition.

National Security Advisor John Bolton stopped short of predicting the ouster of President Nicolas Maduro but said momentum is on the side of Juan Guaido, the National Assembly leader who proclaimed himself acting president.

‘There are countless conversations going on between members of the National Assembly and members of the military in Venezuela, talking about what might come, how they might move to support the opposition,’ Bolton said in an interview on ABC’s This Week.

Many parts of Venezuela remained without power and communications on Sunday after several days of the country’s worst blackouts, which forced some hospitals to treat patients without electricity and compounded an economic and political crisis. 

Ethiopian Airlines crash: Father pays tribute to British UN worker


Joanna Toole (pictured) has been named as one of the British victims of the air disaster in Ethiopia 

The father of a UN animal welfare worker who died in the Ethiopian air disaster has described her as a ‘very soft and loving person’ and said: ‘It’s hard to imagine life without her’. 

Joanna Toole, 36, was one of the 157 passengers and crew who were killed when the Boeing jet crashed within minutes of take-off from Addis Ababa yesterday morning. 

Ms Toole, from Exmouth, Devon, was one of at least 12 passengers who were travelling to Nairobi for a UN environment gathering.  

Ethiopian Airlines said seven Britons, one Irishman, 18 Canadians and eight Americans were killed in the crash. 

Polar expert Sarah Auffret – a British-French dual national – and former Hull resident Joseph Waithaka were named as victims last night but it was unclear if the airline had counted them among the seven Britons. 

All 149 passengers and eight crew members died when the plane came down near the town of Bishoftu.   

Flight-tracking data showed the plane’s vertical speed had fluctuated wildly in the last seconds before the crash.

The Boeing 737 Max 8 model was the same one which crashed on a Lion Air flight in Indonesia last year, killing 189 people. 

All Chinese airlines have now been ordered to ground Boeing 737 Max 8 planes by the country’s civilian aviation authority. 

Sarah Auffret (pictured), a French-British dual national, has been identified as a victim of the Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302

Sarah Auffret (pictured), a French-British dual national, has been identified as a victim of the Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302

Sarah Auffret (pictured), a French-British dual national, has been identified as a victim of the Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302

Irishman Michael Ryan (pictured) who worked for the UN's World Food Programme was another of the 149 passengers killed

Irishman Michael Ryan (pictured) who worked for the UN's World Food Programme was another of the 149 passengers killed

Kenyan-British dual national Joseph Waithaka, pictured, was killed in the crash on his way home from visiting relatives in Hull

Kenyan-British dual national Joseph Waithaka, pictured, was killed in the crash on his way home from visiting relatives in Hull

Irishman Michael Ryan (pictured left), who worked for the UN’s World Food Programme, and Kenyan-British dual national Joseph Waithaka  (right) – who used to live in Hull – were also among the 149 passengers killed 

Members of the search and rescue mission look for dead bodies of passengers at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines disaster

Members of the search and rescue mission look for dead bodies of passengers at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines disaster

Members of the search and rescue mission look for dead bodies of passengers at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines disaster

Paying tribute to Ms Toole, her father Adrian said she had flown around the world but added: ‘Personally I never wanted her to be on a single one of those planes’. 

He said: ‘Joanna’s work was not a job – it was her vocation. She never really wanted to do anything else but work in animal welfare since she was a child.

‘Somehow that work took her into the international sphere and for the last 15 years she has been working for international animal welfare organisations.

Hospitality company Tamarind Group announced 'with immense shock and grief' that its chief executive Jonathan Seex (pictured) was among the fatalities

Hospitality company Tamarind Group announced 'with immense shock and grief' that its chief executive Jonathan Seex (pictured) was among the fatalities

Hospitality company Tamarind Group announced ‘with immense shock and grief’ that its chief executive Jonathan Seex (pictured) was among the fatalities

‘That involves a lot of travelling around the world – although personally I never wanted her to be on a single one of those planes.

‘I’m an environmental campaigner myself, so partly it was because of the damage to the environment but also because it’s a dangerous occupation to be flying. Up until now she had been lucky.

‘Joanna was a very soft and loving person. Everybody was very proud of her and the work she did. We’re still in a state of shock. 

‘Joanna was genuinely one of those people who you never heard a bad word about. She was one of those people who burned the candle at both ends.  

‘She never had any doubt that she wanted to work in animal welfare and on the international scene, that meant a lot of travel. It’s hard to imagine life without her.’

One of her UN colleagues, Manuel Barange, called her a ‘wonderful human being who loved her work with a passion’, saying he was ‘so profoundly sad and lost for words’ at the news of her death. 

According to her LinkedIn page she had worked for the UN since 2016, living in Rome where she recently set up home with her partner.  

She previously worked at World Animal Protection and Animal Defenders International, after graduating from Anglia Ruskin University in 2004 with a degree in Animal Behaviour and Wildlife Biology. 

In a blog she wrote when she worked for WAP she described herself as a keen diver, adding: ‘I’m committed to the protection of all animals, but the underwater world and the animals within it are my greatest passion.’  

Joanna Toole, one of the British victims of the Ethiopian Airlines flight

Joanna Toole, one of the British victims of the Ethiopian Airlines flight

Ms Toole, pictured, worked for the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation

Ms Toole, pictured, worked for the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation

Joanna Toole, pictured, was the first British victim to be named. Paying tribute her father Adrian said she was a ‘very soft and loving person’ whose work with the United Nations was ‘not a job but a vocation’ 

Ms Toole, pictured, was on her way to represent the UN's fisheries wing at the conference in Nairobi this week

Ms Toole, pictured, was on her way to represent the UN's fisheries wing at the conference in Nairobi this week

Ms Toole, pictured, was one of 149 passengers killed

Ms Toole, pictured, was one of 149 passengers killed

Ms Toole, pictured, was one of 149 passengers killed

Polar expert Sarah Auffret, who had French and British dual nationality, was also killed in the crash. Colleagues paid tribute to her as a ‘true friend and beloved colleague’.  

‘Words cannot describe the sorrow and despair we feel,’ her employers at the Norway-based Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators said. 

Raised in Brittany, the environmental agent was leading AECO’s efforts to cut back single-use plastics on Arctic expeditions and coordinating beach clean-ups. 

Another victim, 55-year-old Joseph Waithaka, lived in Hull for more than a decade before returning to his native Kenya in 2015. The BBC reported he had dual Kenyan and British citizenship. 

He had been visiting his wife and children, who still live in Hull, and was on his way back to Kenya via Ethiopia when he boarded the doomed flight aboard the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet.  

Mr Waithaka worked for the probation service during his time in Hull and his family said he had ‘helped so many people’ during his time in England. 

His son, Ben Kuria, said: ‘My dad was a private man but he also had a pastoral heart. He really championed people. He really helped people realise their potential.

‘He would tell stories which would inspire the young people he was helping who were not at a great time in their lives. 

Members of the search and rescue mission look for dead bodies of passengers at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines crash

Members of the search and rescue mission look for dead bodies of passengers at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines crash

Members of the search and rescue mission look for dead bodies of passengers at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines crash

Rescue workers collect bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu following Sunday's air disaster

Rescue workers collect bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu following Sunday's air disaster

Rescue workers collect bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu following Sunday’s air disaster

The graphic shows how the plane's vertical speed fluctuated in the minute before it crashed near Addis Ababa airport

The graphic shows how the plane's vertical speed fluctuated in the minute before it crashed near Addis Ababa airport

The graphic shows how the plane’s vertical speed fluctuated in the minute before it crashed near Addis Ababa airport 

‘As a father he was very protective and he really wanted us to do well. He supported us and ensured we got stuck into our education. He really rooted for his children.’  

The one Irish victim was named as engineer Michael Ryan, an employee of the UN’s World Food Programme – which said seven of its staff members had died in the crash, including two Italians. 

The Rome-based aid worker and engineer, known as Mick, was from Lahinch in Co Clare in Ireland’s west and was believed to be married with two children.  

Last night UK Prime Minister Theresa May said she was ‘deeply saddened to hear of the devastating loss of life following the plane crash in Ethiopia’. 

‘At this very difficult time my thoughts are with the families and friends of the British citizens on board and all those affected by this tragic incident,’ she said. 

Irish premier Leo Varadkar said: ‘Michael was doing life-changing work in Africa with the World Food Programme. Deepest sympathies to family, colleagues and friends.’   

Former U.S. President Barack Obama said on Twitter that he and wife Michelle ‘send our deepest sympathies to all who knew the victims of today’s plane crash in Ethiopia’.  

Representatives of the UN’s High Commissioner for Refugees and an employee of the World Bank also lost their lives in the disaster.   

Wreckage lies at the crash site after the Ethiopian Airlines jet came down within minutes of take-off on Sunday morning

Wreckage lies at the crash site after the Ethiopian Airlines jet came down within minutes of take-off on Sunday morning

Wreckage lies at the crash site after the Ethiopian Airlines jet came down within minutes of take-off on Sunday morning

The wreckage of the plane - showing the colours of the Ethiopian flag on the plane's livery - lies at the scene of the crash

The wreckage of the plane - showing the colours of the Ethiopian flag on the plane's livery - lies at the scene of the crash

The wreckage of the plane – showing the colours of the Ethiopian flag on the plane’s livery – lies at the scene of the crash 

Families and strangers embrace in Ethiopia and Kenya

Families and strangers embrace in Ethiopia and Kenya

Tearful relatives left the information centre as they tried to find their loved ones

Tearful relatives left the information centre as they tried to find their loved ones

The families of those on the plane have been arriving at special information centres to find out their next steps

Family members of the victims involved in a plane crash react at Addis Ababa international airport Sunday, hours after their loves ones took off

Family members of the victims involved in a plane crash react at Addis Ababa international airport Sunday, hours after their loves ones took off

Family members of the victims involved in a plane crash react at Addis Ababa international airport Sunday, hours after their loves ones took off

Ethiopia Airlines group CEO, Mr Tewolde Gebremariam, who is pictured at the accident scene. Firefighters spent hours trying to get to the scene

Ethiopia Airlines group CEO, Mr Tewolde Gebremariam, who is pictured at the accident scene. Firefighters spent hours trying to get to the scene

Ethiopia Airlines group CEO, Mr Tewolde Gebremariam, who is pictured at the accident scene. Firefighters spent hours trying to get to the scene

As more victims were identified last night:

  • Hospitality company Tamarind Group announced ‘with immense shock and grief’ that its chief executive Jonathan Seex was among the fatalities. 
  • Anton Hrnko, an MP for the nationalist Slovak National Party, said he was ‘in deep grief’ to announce that his wife Blanka, daughter Michala and son Martin were among the dead. 
  • Three members of Italian aid group Africa Tremila were on board. The group’s president Carlo Spini, his wife Gabriella Viggiani, and treasurer Matteo Ravasio were among the eight Italians killed. 
  • The African Diaspora Youth Forum in Europe said co-chairman Karim Saafi had been a passenger on the flight and had been due to represent them at a meeting with the African Union in Nairobi.
  • Professor Pius Adesamni was named as a victim by Benoit-Antoine Bacon, the president and vice-chancellor of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.
  • Hussein Swaleh, the former secretary general of the Football Kenya Federation, was named as being among the dead by Sofapaka Football Club. 
  • Abiodun Oluremi Bashua – a retired envoy who served in Iran, Austria and Ivory Coast – was killed, Nigeria’s foreign affairs ministry said.
  • Austrian media reported that three doctors who were aged between 30 and 40 and worked at hospitals in Linz had died.
  • Save the Children said its child protection in emergencies adviser Tamirat Mulu Demessie was among the dead.
  • Three of the Russians on board were tourists Yekaterina Polyakova, Alexander Polyakov and Sergei Vyalikov, the Russian Embassy in Ethiopia said.

It also emerged last night that U.S. aviation officials had issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive warning that pilots of Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 planes ‘could have difficulty controlling the airplane’ because of a problem with one of its systems. 

A faulty sensor could cause ‘excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss, and possible impact with terrain’, the Federal Aviation Administration had warned. 

Wreckage lies at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 which came down en route to Nairobi

Wreckage lies at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 which came down en route to Nairobi

Wreckage lies at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 which came down en route to Nairobi

Part of the plane lies on the ground near Bishoftu following the crash on Sunday morning in which 157 people were killed

Part of the plane lies on the ground near Bishoftu following the crash on Sunday morning in which 157 people were killed

Part of the plane lies on the ground near Bishoftu following the crash on Sunday morning in which 157 people were killed

Flight-tracking data revealed that the plane’s vertical speed – the rate of climb or descent – varied from 2,624 feet per minute to minus 1,216 within minutes of take-off.   

Lucky passenger avoids crash after missing flight 

A passenger has spoken of his relief after he missed the doomed Ethiopian Airlines flight. 

Ahmed Khalid was connecting in Addis Ababa on his way from Dubai to Nairobi but the first half of his trip was delayed. 

As a result he missed the ill-fated flight and boarded a later connection to Kenya. 

He said passengers were asking the cabin crew what had happened but received little information, Global News reported. 

Upon arrival in Nairobi he was greeted by his equally relieved father, Khalid Bzambur.  

Passenger Ahmed Khalid (left), who missed the doomed Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 while connecting from Dubai, meets his father Khalid Bzambur (right) in Nairobi

Passenger Ahmed Khalid (left), who missed the doomed Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 while connecting from Dubai, meets his father Khalid Bzambur (right) in Nairobi

Passenger Ahmed Khalid (left), who missed the doomed Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 while connecting from Dubai, meets his father Khalid Bzambur (right) in Nairobi

According to flight-tracking website FlightRadar24, the plane, which was new and was delivered to the airline last November, ‘had unstable vertical speed’ shortly after take off.  

Aviation experts described the data as extremely unusual, saying that once a plane has taken off the vertical speed should rise or remain stable.     

Expert Sally Gethin said the plane’s rapidly fluctuating speed may indicate that the aircraft stalled in the moments before it crashed. 

She said: ‘It’s the rate of climb or descent – the most critical phases of flight. Instability at that point e.g. too slow – could destabilise the aircraft, potentially risking stalling and other hazardous consequences. It might indicate the pilots had difficulty controlling the climb/ascent.’

An experienced pilot told MailOnline the activity was highly unusual. 

He said: ‘A positive number indicates the aircraft is going up. After takeoff you would expect all these numbers to be positive as the aircraft climbed away from the ground, or zero if they are flying level. 

‘The small amount of data released so far indicates that after only one minute or so of the flight this aircraft started a descent at a rate of up to 1920 feet per minute down. If the data is correct that is extremely unusual. 

‘The data then shows the aircraft going up and down until the data stops. That is why some people are referring to unstable vertical speed. 

‘You would not expect a descent unless you were immediately returning, and if that was the case you wouldn’t then expect the aircraft to climb again. 

‘After takeoff aircraft either climb or fly level for a period then climb again.’  

Boeing has said it will send a forensic team out to the crash site however it has been a site of activity all day with dozens of locals crossing on foot and big machinery being driven over

Boeing has said it will send a forensic team out to the crash site however it has been a site of activity all day with dozens of locals crossing on foot and big machinery being driven over

Boeing has said it will send a forensic team out to the crash site however it has been a site of activity all day with dozens of locals crossing on foot and big machinery being driven over

Pictures from the wreckage show people's shoes and burned bags scattered across the ground after the crash in Ethiopia

Pictures from the wreckage show people's shoes and burned bags scattered across the ground after the crash in Ethiopia

Pictures from the wreckage show people’s shoes and burned bags scattered across the ground after the crash in Ethiopia 

A relative reacts as he leaves the information centre following the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi

A relative reacts as he leaves the information centre following the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi

A relative reacts as he leaves the information centre following the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi

Debris from the plane is strewn around the area while locals comb the area for any signs of survival from the crash

Debris from the plane is strewn around the area while locals comb the area for any signs of survival from the crash

Debris from the plane is strewn around the area while locals comb the area for any signs of survival from the crash 

After the news all onboard had died families cried and talked on the phone at the airport. Families have said they are being told nothing about what has happened

After the news all onboard had died families cried and talked on the phone at the airport. Families have said they are being told nothing about what has happened

After the news all onboard had died families cried and talked on the phone at the airport. Families have said they are being told nothing about what has happened 

A woman reacts as she waits for the updated flight information of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302, where her fiance was onboard at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi, Kenya

A woman reacts as she waits for the updated flight information of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302, where her fiance was onboard at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi, Kenya

A woman reacts as she waits for the updated flight information of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302, where her fiance was onboard at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi, Kenya

Family members arrive at Bole International airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, after hearing news of the crash

Family members arrive at Bole International airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, after hearing news of the crash

Family members arrive at Bole International airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, after hearing news of the crash

Rescue team walk past collected bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa

Rescue team walk past collected bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa

Rescue team walk past collected bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa

Boeing said it was ‘deeply saddened’ by news of the crash and would sent technical experts to Ethiopia to help investigate the crash.     

The plane came down near Bishoftu, Ethiopia, 37 miles (60km) south of the Addis Ababa. A witness told the BBC it took rescuers until 11am to arrive.

Witness Bekele Gutema said: ‘The blast and the fire were so strong that we couldn’t get near it. Everything is burnt down.’ 

The pilot had sent out a distress call and was given the all clear to return, according to the airline’s chief executive Tewolde Gebremariam.

Senior captain Yared Getachew had a ‘commendable performance’ having completed more than 8,000 hours in the air, the airline said. 

The scene of the crash on rural land in Ethiopia. All passengers on board the plane died on Sunday, the airline confirmed

The scene of the crash on rural land in Ethiopia. All passengers on board the plane died on Sunday, the airline confirmed

The scene of the crash on rural land in Ethiopia. All passengers on board the plane died on Sunday, the airline confirmed 

Ethiopian Airlines Group CEO Tewolde GebreMariam inspects the newly-arrived Boeing 737 Max 8 months before the crash

Ethiopian Airlines Group CEO Tewolde GebreMariam inspects the newly-arrived Boeing 737 Max 8 months before the crash

Ethiopian Airlines Group CEO Tewolde GebreMariam inspects the newly-arrived Boeing 737 Max 8 months before the crash

List of nationalities on board the Ethiopia Airlines flight

Kenya: 32 passengers

Canada: 18

Ethiopia: 9

China: 8

Italy: 8

United States: 8

France: 7

UK: 7

Egypt: 6

Germany: 5

India: 4

Slovakia: 4

Austria: 3

Russia: 3

Sweden: 3

Spain: 2

Israel: 2

Morocco: 2   

Poland: 2   

Belgium: 1

Djibouti: 1

Ireland: 1

Indonesia: 1

Mozambique: 1

Norway: 1

Rwanda: 1

Saudi Arabia: 1

Sudan: 1

Somalia: 1

Serbia: 1

Togo: 1

Uganda: 1

Yemen: 1

Nepal: 1

Nigeria: 1

U.N. passport: 1     

Djibouti: 1   

An Ethiopian Airports fire engine rushes to the scene of the crash on Sunday morning. It took them until 11am to get there

An Ethiopian Airports fire engine rushes to the scene of the crash on Sunday morning. It took them until 11am to get there

An Ethiopian Airports fire engine rushes to the scene of the crash on Sunday morning. It took them until 11am to get there

The loved ones of plane passengers heading to Nairobi were waiting for news at the airport yesterday morning

The loved ones of plane passengers heading to Nairobi were waiting for news at the airport yesterday morning

The loved ones of plane passengers heading to Nairobi were waiting for news at the airport yesterday morning

The plane had been heading towards Nairobi when it came down in Ethiopia. It was just 31 miles from Addis Ababa Airport

The plane had been heading towards Nairobi when it came down in Ethiopia. It was just 31 miles from Addis Ababa Airport

The plane had been heading towards Nairobi when it came down in Ethiopia. It was just 31 miles from Addis Ababa Airport

The plane had reportedly travelled for six minutes when it came down to the ground

The plane had reportedly travelled for six minutes when it came down to the ground

The plane had reportedly travelled for six minutes when it came down to the ground 

The plane had flown from Johannesburg to Addis earlier on Sunday morning, and had undergone a ‘rigorous’ testing on February 4, a statement continued.  

The plane, a 737 MAX 8, is believed to be a new addition to the EA fleet having been delivered last year – and is the same model as the Lion Air plane which crashed in Indonesia in October. 

Last night Cayman Airways president Fabian Whorms said both of the airline’s new Max 8s will not fly from Monday. 

Boeing issued a safety warning last November about its new 737 Max jets which could have a fault that causes them to nose-dive. The MAX-8 planes were launched in 2016 and are used by major airlines all around the world. 

The state-owned Ethiopian Airlines calls itself Africa’s largest carrier and has ambitions of becoming the gateway to the continent.  

Ethiopian Airlines said they had contacted the victims’ families and said the bodies would be returned home once they had been identified.    

Ethiopian Airlines hopes to become the most prominent airline on the continent. Pictured: A man looks at his phone outside the Ethiopian Airlines offices in downtown Nairobi, Kenya

Ethiopian Airlines hopes to become the most prominent airline on the continent. Pictured: A man looks at his phone outside the Ethiopian Airlines offices in downtown Nairobi, Kenya

Ethiopian Airlines hopes to become the most prominent airline on the continent. Pictured: A man looks at his phone outside the Ethiopian Airlines offices in downtown Nairobi, Kenya

A Djiboutian national Hiba (L) is comforted by a relative as she waits for details of her loved one that was on board the flight Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi

A Djiboutian national Hiba (L) is comforted by a relative as she waits for details of her loved one that was on board the flight Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi

A Djiboutian national Hiba (L) is comforted by a relative as she waits for details of her loved one that was on board the flight Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi

Passengers wait outside the Bole International airport Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Families returned to the airport to try and get news of the crash

Passengers wait outside the Bole International airport Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Families returned to the airport to try and get news of the crash

Passengers wait outside the Bole International airport Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Families returned to the airport to try and get news of the crash 

A flight information board displaying the details of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 is seen at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport

A flight information board displaying the details of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 is seen at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport

A flight information board displaying the details of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 is seen at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport

Boeing 737 Max jets were investigated after Indonesia plane crash

Boeing issued a safety warning last November about its new 737 Max jets which could have a fault that causes them to nose-dive.

The special bulletin sent to operators was about a sensor problem flagged by Indonesian safety officials investigating the crash of a Lion Air 737 that killed 189 people just a week before the memo was sent.

Since the 737 Max was unveiled in 2017, 350 of the jets have been bought, with around a further future 4,761 orders placed.

More than 40 airlines around the world use the 737 Max, which has four kinds in the fleet, numbered 7, 8, 9 and 10.

Airlines such as Norwegian Air, Air China, TUI, Air Canada, United Airlines, American Airlines, Turkish Airlines, Icelandair and FlyDubai.

The 8 series, which was involved in the crash in Indonesia, has been flying the longest of all the Maxes.

Boeing said in November that local aviation officials believed pilots may have been given wrong information by the plane’s automated systems before the fatal crash.

An AOA sensor provides data about the angle at which wind is passing over the wings and tells pilots how much lift a plane is getting.

According to a technical log the Lion Air plane, which had only been in service a few months, suffered instrument problems the day before because of an ‘unreliable’ airspeed reading.

The MAX models  are relatively new but has already been investigated after problems reported. Pictured: Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 (stock image)

The MAX models  are relatively new but has already been investigated after problems reported. Pictured: Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 (stock image)

The MAX models  are relatively new but has already been investigated after problems reported. Pictured: Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 (stock image)

Minutes after takeoff the plane suddenly nose-dived hitting speeds of 600mph before slamming into the sea.

The warning issued today read: ‘The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has indicated that Lion Air flight 610 experienced erroneous input from one of its AOA (Angle of Attack) sensors.

‘Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB) directing operators to existing flight crew procedures to address circumstances where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor.’

As a result of an investigation into the crash the jet manufacturer is said to be preparing a bulletin to be sent to operators of the 737 jets warning about faulty cockpit readings that could cause a dive.

The notice refers to the ‘angle of attack’, which is the angle of the wing relative to oncoming air stream, a measure that indicates if a plane is likely to stall.

This angle of attack, which is a calculation of the angle at which the wind is passing over the wings, is used to be determined if a stall is imminent.

Inspectors found faults on two other Boeing 737 MAX jets, including one which mirrored a problem reported on board the Lion Air plane.

Ethiopian Airlines air crash is the second involving brand new Boeing 737 in just three months after 189 were killed in Indonesia tragedy

By Joel Adams for MailOnline

The tragic deaths of 157 passengers and crew yesterday, when an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft crashed within minutes of take-off in Addis Ababa, are raising serious questions over the safety record of both aircraft and airline.

It was on another brand new Boeing 737 Max 8, in Indonesia less than five months ago, that 189 people lost their lives in the Java Sea when Lion Air Flight 610 plummeted out of the skies minutes after taking off from Jakarta.

And the incident brings the African carrier’s death toll to 482 across 22 fatal incidents since its inception in 1965 – and almost 500 more people have been injured in EA crashes and incidents, according to information from the Flight Safety Foundation.

For comparison, only one British Airways flight has only ever been involved in one fatal incident: the Zagreb runway crash of 1976 when all 176 people aboard two planes died when BA Flight 476 collided with another aircraft on takeoff due to an air traffic control error.

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 went down within six minutes of take-off this morning (pictured: stock image)

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 went down within six minutes of take-off this morning (pictured: stock image)

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 went down within six minutes of take-off this morning (pictured: stock image)

Initial reports yesterday showed considerable similarities between the Ethiopian and Indonesian disasters which involve the same plane.

Yesterday’s flight lost contact about six minutes after take-off, having requested and been given clearance to return to the airport in Abbis Ababa.

Last year, Lion Air 610 also went down minutes after take-off having requested permission to return to base.

Yesterday, telemetry shows the plane’s vertical airspeed fluctuated rapidly in the minutes and second before its crash, including in the final moments when it seems to have been locked in a terrifyingly accelerating nosedive,.

Investigations thus far by the Indonesian and American aviation authorities have concluded the Lion Air plane also hit the sea after a violent nosedive.

The New York Times reports that investigators are considering whether that dive might have been caused by updated Boeing software that was meant to prevent a stall – but that can send the plane into a fatal descent if the altitude and angle information being fed into the computer system is incorrect.

The change in the flight control system, which can override manual motions in the Max model, was not explained to pilots, according to some pilots’ unions.

After that crash, Boeing said that it was continuing ‘to evaluate the need for software or other changes as we learn more from the ongoing investigation.’ It was unclear if the company had made any changes.

In a statement on Sunday, Boeing said it was ‘deeply saddened’ to learn of the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.

Indonesian emergency services carry a body bag in the wake of the Lion Air disaster last year

Indonesian emergency services carry a body bag in the wake of the Lion Air disaster last year

Indonesian emergency services carry a body bag in the wake of the Lion Air disaster last year  

‘A Boeing technical team is prepared to provide technical assistance at the request and under the direction of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board,’ the company said.

The state-owned Ethiopian Airlines calls itself Africa’s largest carrier and has ambitions of becoming the gateway to the continent.

The airline does have a better safety rating and a newer fleet than some neighbouring operators – a number of African airlines are banned outright from EU airspace including the flag-carrier of neighbouring Eritrea.

But in addition to 16 fatal incidents costing 102 lives in the 1960s, 70s, and 1980s; the airline has now suffered six fatal incidents in the last thirty years, including other two huge tragedies.

In 1996 after a hijacking and a failed water landing, 125 people died on Flight 961 in Moroni, the capital of the Union of the Comoros in the Indian Ocean.

And in January 2010, 82 passengers and eight crew died when EA flight 409 from Beirut to Addis Ababa slammed into the Mediterranean shortly after take-off. 

Boeing’s 737 is the world’s most-sold passenger jet family and is considered one of the industry’s most reliable. 

The MAX 8 is the latest version of the aircraft, which Boeing rolled out in 2017 as an update to the already redesigned 50-year-old 737.

By the end of January, Boeing had delivered 350 MAX jets out of the total order tally of 5,011 aircraft.  

New test can diagnose killer infection in minutes to save lives – Independent.ie


Stock Image
Stock Image

A new rapid test for sepsis which can give a result within three minutes has been developed by scientists.

The test could save thousands of lives from the deadly condition and experts hope it will be available within three to five years.

At present, it can take up to 72 hours to diagnose sepsis.

Sepsis hit the headlines following the tragic death of Dublin teenager Sean Hughes in January 2018.

His devastated parents succeeded in getting a health awareness campaign on to buses in the capital in the hope of making more people aware of the killer infection.

The new low-cost test, developed by researchers at Strathclyde University in Glasgow, Scotland, uses a biosensor device to see whether the protein biomarker interleukin-6 (IL-6) is in the bloodstream.

IL-6 is a molecule secreted by the immune system and is often found in high levels in people with sepsis.

During research at Strathclyde, the new test picked up IL-6 within two-and-a-half minutes.

Experts in the UK hope the test will be used at the bedside in hospitals and in GP surgeries.

Its needle shape means it can also be implanted and used on patients in intensive care.

Dr Damion Corrigan, from the department of biomedical engineering at Strathclyde University, said: “With sepsis, the timing is key. For every hour that you delay antibiotic treatment, the likelihood of death increases.

“At the moment, the 72-hour blood test is a very labour-intensive process but the type of test we envisage could be at the bedside.

“If GP surgeries had access they could also do quick tests which could potentially save lives.”

Irish Independent